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Sunday, March 24, 2019

An Interview with author Skye Taylor



Why did you start fiction writing and what genre(s) do you like to write?

I started writing fiction in high school, encouraged by an English teacher I had for my junior and senior years. I have to admit his first assignment was daunting at first. He wanted 500 words on an odor. I'm thinking, Yikes! How could I possibly use up 500 words talking about something I could smell. I ended up writing about the scent of sheets dried outside on the line and got an A+. I've been writing both fiction and non-fiction ever since. My first published work was non-fiction: essays about my Peace Corps experiences. Now available on my website. I've since written and published historical romance, contemporary romance, women's fiction and mainstream.

Why do you write the genres you do? What attracts you to them?

Who doesn't enjoy a good love story? Although I have to admit, one of my best books was the mainstream published by eWings in 2016 (originally in 2012 but reissued with a new title in 2016) THE CANDIDATE. I am currently working on a mystery, sub-genre-police procedural. I like a challenge, and I'm always eager for a new adventure so writing the same thing over and over isn't my thing. 

Generally speaking, what is the driving force behind your characters? Have any of your characters changed in dramatic way from what you imagined at the start during the writing process?

Most of my stories have been character driven, as opposed to carefully plotted. I create rich and detailed backstories for all my main characters, then set them into the midst of the inciting incident and let them take it from there. I am often surprised by the choices they make or the things they say, but in reflecting they are usually true to the character I've created.

What do you find the most difficult in finishing a story and approximately how long does it take for you to write a story?

My Romances took between 30 and 60 days to write the rough draft - mainly because the entire story is the conflict between the hero and the heroine, with little distraction. But THE CANDIDATE took a lot longer. There were five point of view characters and a lot of story arcs to keep in mind. My most recent book, WORRY STONE, which is nominally romance, could also be mainstream, took me about 3 months to complete the rough draft. I am noticing that the mystery is taking longer than any other book, because so many threads have to be woven in as you write to make the mystery and the solution believable. Then again, it's the first book I've actually plotted out ahead of writing it.

Are there other types of writing you do such as non-fiction, or short fiction?

I've written a number of short stories, some of which are in anthologies and many are available for free on mywebsite. Two are free on Amazon. And as mentioned before, the essays about my Peace Corps experiences 2002-2004.

Has your writing affected you in any way and what would you recommend to someone wanting to start writing fiction?

I am now retired from my 9-5 working life and my writing gives my days focus. Besides I truly enjoy the process of creating characters, researching the background and the writing process. Until I can't type any more, I expect I'll be at it until the end. For anyone wanting to write fiction, my advice is to just start writing, join a writers chapter somewhere. If it's romance, you're writing, find the closest RWA chapter. Mainstream and general fiction and non-fiction groups are out there. I live in Florida and Florida Writers Association is a marvelous group with chapters all over the state supporting writers of everything from poetry, journalism and non-fiction, to all genres of fiction. There is Sisters in Crime for mystery writers as well as other genre specific writers’ groups. And the best thing is to find other writers, both published and not that you can meet with for brainstorming and critique.

You can keep up with Skye at:

Skye Taylor on Good Reads
Skye Taylor on Facebook

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